Female Urology, Gynecology

The Use of Physical Therapy in Treatment for Endometriosis

?I have had severe endometriosis for many years and have had several surgeries. Also started having another type of pain, which was very severe. It felt to me like bladder spasms, and I was having frequency urination of every 20 minutes all day long. I finally went to an excellent urologist who was able to feel my pelvic floor muscles through an internal exam and found that my pelvic floor muscles were in spasm (or hypertonic). He prescribed Ativan for a very short term and physical therapy. . . "

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Facts and Myths about An Often Unspoken issue, Unconsummated Marriages

The 1999 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association by Dr. Edward Laumann indicating that 31% of men and 43% of women suffer from sexual dysfunction raised awareness in both the medical world and the general population of the prevalence of sexual problems. Today, women?s magazines, popular internet sites and television program openly discuss sexuality, sexual health and sexual problems, from erectile dysfunction, to persistent arousal, and even the fact that many marriages are, essentially, sexless.

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Genital Herpes and Its Impact on Partners

Half a million people in the U.S. are diagnosed with genital herpes each year, and for some, the diagnosis is fraught with emotional issues and concerns. ?What impact will herpes have on my sex life?? ?How do I tell my partner?? Charles Ebel is the senior director for program development of the American Social Health Association, addresses these issues and more. Mr. Ebel is co-author of the book Managing Herpes, with Anna Wald, MD, MPH, and he directs the work of the National Herpes Resource Center (hotline #877.411.4377).

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Why I Chose an Elective C-Section

Dr, Jennifer Berman, Site Medical Director
A growing number of women are requesting delivery by elective cesarean section without an accepted "medical indication," and physicians were in the past either uncertain how to respond or unwilling to perform elective C-Sections.
The reason being that it was believed that the risk of surgery outweighed the benefit to the fetus and the mother. This trend is now changing due to the fact that cesarean delivery is much safer now than in the past and to the recognition that most studies looking at the risks of cesarean section were biased, due to fact that women in studies more likely to have been selected for an elective cesarean sections as well as non elective C-Sections.

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